Cooking With Wine

Steak-Frites
Featuring FRENCH GAMAY NOUVEAU

 

Recipe:

  • 4 beef steaks, such as porterhouse, sirloin, rib eye, shel or filet mignon (1/2 pound
    each and ¾ to 1 inch thick), or one 2-pound steak
  • 5 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste 
  • ¼ cup French Gamay Nouveau 

Directions:

Melt 3 tablespoons of the butter in a large heavy skilet or sauté pan over high heat until hot but not smoking. Add the steaks and sear for 1 minute on each side. Reduce the heat to medium. Season the steaks generously with salt and pepper and continue cooking, turning the steaks every other minute, until you see little pearls of blood come to the surface, about 6 to 8 minutes. For juicy, tender meat the steaks should be cooked medium rare.

Remove the steaks and place them on warmed plates. Over medium heat, deglaze the pan with the water and swirl in the remaining 2 tablespoons butter. Drizzle these pan juices over the meat and serve at once with fries.

(Serves four)

Steak Frites

Best French Fries Ever

There is no fancy skill involved in making these crispy fries, but there is a trick. The potatoes are fried twice. The first time cooks them through and makes them tender. The second time, which can be done hours later just before serving, turns them golden brown and deliciously crisp.

You won't need a lot of special equipment, but a few items are essential. If you own an
electric deep fryer, you're al set. If not, a 4-quart fryer with a basket insert and a separate deep-fat thermometer is your next choice. In a pinch, use a heavy pot that is at least 5 inches deep, a long-handled fried-food skimmer or very large long-handled slotted spoon, and a deep-fat thermometer.

The size of the fries is a very personal matter. Some people like them very thin and crunchy. Others prefer them quite large so that they can be crispy on the outside and soft in the center. Experiment to find the size you like best. Very thinly cut potato sticks need a shorter frying time, and the thicker ones take a little longer.

Note: When frying anything in deep fat, always keep a lid close by. In case of fire, turn off the heat and cover the pan.

Recipe: 

  • 1 litre (4 cups) vegetable oil for frying
  • 1 kilogram (2 pounds) Idaho or russet baking potatoes or Yukon Gold potatoes,
    peeled, rinsed and dried
  • Salt to taste

Directions:

Pour enough oil into a deep fryer to reach at least halfway up the sides of the pan but not more than three-quarters of the way up. Heat the oil to 325°F. Cut the potatoes into sticks 1/2 inch wide and 2 1/2 to 3 inches long. Dry al the pieces thoroughly in a clean dish towel. This wil keep your oil from splattering. Divide the potato sticks into batches of no more than 1 cup each. Do not fry more than one batch at a time.

When the oil has reached the desired temperature, fry the potatoes for 4 to 5 minutes per batch. They should be lightly colored but not browned. If your fryer has a basket, simply lift it out the remove the fried potatoes. Otherwise, use a long-handled skimmer to lift out the potatoes. Be sure to bring the temperature of the oil back to 325°F in between batches. At this point the fries can rest for several hours at room temperature until you are almost ready to serve them.

When you are almost ready to serve, heat the oil again to 325°F. Fry the potatoes for the second time in 1-cup batches until they are nicely browned and crisp, 1 to 2 minutes. Drain on fresh paper towels or brown paper bags and place in a warmed serving bowl lined with more paper towels. Sprinkle with salt and serve.

 

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